Posts for: December, 2016

By Cesar Acosta, DMD, Family Dentistry
December 30, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics   retainers  
ARetainerHelpsYouKeepYourNewSmileAfterBraces

Moving your teeth to a more functional and attractive alignment is a big undertaking. You can invest months — even years — and a lot of expense to correct a bad bite. But all that effort could be for nothing if your teeth return to their original positions.

The very aspect of dental physiology that makes orthodontics possible can work against you in reverse. Your teeth are not actually rigidly fixed in the bone: they're held in place by an elastic gum tissue known as the periodontal ligament. The ligament lies between the tooth and the bone and attaches to both with tiny fibers.

While this mechanism holds the teeth firmly in place, it also allows the teeth to move in response to changes in the mouth. As we age, for example, and the teeth wear, the ligament allows movement of the teeth to accommodate for the loss of tooth surface that might have been created by the wear.

When we employ braces we're changing the mouth environment by applying pressure to the teeth in a certain direction. The teeth move in response to this pressure. But when the pressure is no longer there after removing the braces or other orthodontic devices, the ligament mechanism may then respond with a kind of “muscle memory” to pull the teeth back to where they were before.

To prevent this, we need to help the teeth maintain their new position, at least until they've become firmly set. We do this with an oral appliance known as a retainer. Just as its name implies it helps the teeth “retain” their new position.

We require most patients to initially wear their retainer around the clock. After a while we can scale back to just a few hours a day, usually at nighttime. Younger patients may only need to wear a retainer for eighteen months or so. Adults, though, may need to wear one for much longer or in some cases permanently to maintain their new bite.

Although having to wear a retainer can be tedious at times, it's a crucial part of your orthodontic treatment. By wearing one you'll have a better chance of permanently keeping your new smile.

If you would like more information on caring for your teeth after braces, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.”


By Cesar Acosta, DMD, Family Dentistry
December 22, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: TMJ   tmd   jaw pain  

Your jaw is an important part of the overall function of your mouth and the shape of your face. It allows you to chew, talk, smile and laugh jaw painnormally. So when there's a problem with your jaw, it can become a daily nuisance. Dr. Cesar Acosta in Turlock, CA, helps patients with common jaw disorders, such as TMJ/TMD. Find out more about this jaw-related problem and how it can be successfully treated by a dentist.

What Is TMJ/TMD?
TMD is an acronym for temporomandibular joint disorder. It causes pain and discomfort in the area where the upper and lower jaw connects. This is usually caused by inflammation of the muscles, tendons and ligaments in the face that help your jaw move. It can develop over time after grinding and clenching your teeth or from having a severe bite problem (i.e. over or underbite).

Signs You May Have TMJ Disorder
There is one telling sign that you may have an issue with TMD. If you hear a clicking or popping sound in your jaw whenever you open or close your mouth, that may be a symptom of this condition. This is often accompanied by joint or muscle pain in the face. In a severe case of TMD, it can be difficult to eat or speak. Luckily, some of these symptoms can be relieved after a few visits with your Turlock dentist.

How Is It Treated?
There are a number of ways that your dentist can treat TMD. One way is to adjust the jaw to a better position using an orthodontic treatment. Some patients get relief with dental restorations like a dental bridge. In the early stages of this problem, wearing a custom dental night guard designed to fit your mouth can help stop grinding and clenching.

Call for Treatment
If you feel that you may have a problem with TMD, get treatment with Dr. Cesar Acosta, your dentist in Turlock, CA. Call to schedule a dentist appointment with Dr. Acosta today at 209-250-2560.


By Cesar Acosta, DMD, Family Dentistry
December 15, 2016
Category: Oral Health
NoahGallowaysDentallyDangerousDancing

For anyone else, having a tooth accidentally knocked out while practicing a dance routine would be a very big deal. But not for Dancing With The Stars contestant Noah Galloway. Galloway, an Iraq War veteran and a double amputee, took a kick to the face from his partner during a recent practice session, which knocked out a front tooth. As his horrified partner looked on, Galloway picked the missing tooth up from the floor, rinsed out his mouth, and quickly assessed his injury. “No big deal,” he told a cameraman capturing the scene.

Of course, not everyone would have the training — or the presence of mind — to do what Galloway did in that situation. But if you’re facing a serious dental trauma, such as a knocked out tooth, minutes count. Would you know what to do under those circumstances? Here’s a basic guide.

If a permanent tooth is completely knocked out of its socket, you need to act quickly. Once the injured person is stable, recover the tooth and gently clean it with water — but avoid grasping it by its roots! Next, if possible, place the tooth back in its socket in the jaw, making sure it is facing the correct way. Hold it in place with a damp cloth or gauze, and rush to the dental office, or to the emergency room if it’s after hours or if there appear to be other injuries.

If it isn’t possible to put the tooth back, you can place it between the cheek and gum, or in a plastic bag with the patient’s saliva, or in the special tooth-preserving liquid found in some first-aid kits. Either way, the sooner medical attention is received, the better the chances that the tooth can be saved.

When a tooth is loosened or displaced but not knocked out, you should receive dental attention within six hours of the accident. In the meantime, you can rinse the mouth with water and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (such as ibuprofen) to ease pain. A cold pack temporarily applied to the outside of the face can also help relieve discomfort.

When teeth are broken or chipped, you have up to 12 hours to get dental treatment. Follow the guidelines above for pain relief, but don’t forget to come in to the office even if the pain isn’t severe. Of course, if you experience bleeding that can’t be controlled after five minutes, dizziness, loss of consciousness or intense pain, seek emergency medical help right away.

And as for Noah Galloway:  In an interview a few days later, he showed off his new smile, with the temporary bridge his dentist provided… and he even continued to dance with the same partner!

If you would like more information about dental trauma, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”




Contact Us

Cesar Acosta DMD, Family Dentistry

(209) 250-2560
1065 Colorado Avenue Ste 3 Turlock, CA 95380